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Avoid Holiday Weight Gain


Don't think that it is inevitable to gain weight during the holidays. And don't think that you have to miss out on everything to keep from doing so either. Just make some smart, preventative decisions, and you'll be on your way of escaping the holidays without one pound of weight gain.

Here's some tips for yourself or when hosting for others.

1. Go to town on H2O.

Drinking water helps people feel full, and as a result consume fewer calories. Rather than guzzling calorie- and sugar-laden sodas and juices (which are associated with increased body fat and blood pressure) treat yourself to a glass of wine with dinner and keep your allegiance to water for the rest of the day.

2. Eat before drinking and celebrating.

Skipping breakfast or lunch in order to “save your appetite” is probably one of the worst mistakes you can make. Not eating until the afternoon may lead to binging later on, and chances are, you'll be binging on some high-calorie foods. So don't skip a meal before your event or party.

3. Pick protein.

Protein can help maintain a healthy weight because high-protein diets are associated with greater satiety (bonus benefit: It’s important for healthy muscle growth). Make sure to serve up or eat up some turkey, roasted chicken, or animal-free alternatives like quinoa, lentils, or beans.

4. Bring your own.

Rather than try to figure out what’s in every dish at a friend’s party (or avoid eating altogether), bring a healthy side dish or dessert. Taste the what you want, but know you have a healthy alternative to fall back on. Fruit trays are so easy to pick up on the way to any event.

5. Eat and chew slowly.

Eating slowly may not be easy when appetizer options are endless, but it pays off to pace yourself. The quicker we eat, the less time the body has to register fullness. So slow down and take a second to savor each bite of baked brie or scoop of spiced nuts.

5. Serve meals restaurant-style.

When you sit down for the main event, leave food in the kitchen (away from reach) rather than display a basket full of piping hot rolls, multiple casseroles, and an entire turkey directly on the table. When you’ve cleaned your plate, take a breather, and then decide if you really want seconds. Changing up the environment—in this case, by leaving food near the stove—can help reduce overall food intake.

6. Fill up on fiber.

Snacking on vegetables and other high-fiber items like legumes can help keep us fuller, longer (though there’s always space for dessert). Give the vegetable platter a second chance with a healthy, tasty dip.

7. Use smaller plates.

Plate sizes have expanded significantly over the years. Whenever possible, choose the smaller salad plate (8-10 inches) instead of a tray-like one (12 inches or more). Using smaller plates can actually make us feel fuller with less food. The brain associates a big white space on the plate with less food (and smaller plates generally require smaller portio